[SLED] Random Thoughts on the Evolution of Virtual Worlds

Aldon Hynes Aldon.Hynes at Orient-Lodge.com
Tue Oct 12 13:06:34 PDT 2010


Personally, I believe that if virtual world companies focused more on
selling support than on selling software or virtual products, and such
support could include building support, then we would be seeing much more
progress in virtual worlds.  I believe that Open Source software logic has
great bearing on VW Objects.

Some of this relates to the cost or production.  The cost of producing
software, and virtual objects is very similar.  It is the effort of the
creators that is costly, and not the cost of the materials to reproduce the
object.  As long as that is the case efforts to protect the creators efforts
through using legal mechanisms or technical mechanisms to artificially raise
the cost of reproduction are bound to be less effective.

None of this goes against what Stalman or other say about paying creators
for their work.  My friends at Redhat are well paid.  However, they are
looking for more efficient ways of getting paid for what actually costs
something, the effort of creation, instead of getting paid for what actually
costs very little, the cost of reproduction.

Aldon

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Larry Havenstein [mailto:lhavenst at ksu.edu]
> Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 4:14 PM
> To: Aldon Hynes; SL Educators TThe SLED List"
> Subject: Re: [SLED] Random Thoughts on the Evolution of Virtual Worlds
>
>
> Redhat, Canonical, and Novell/VMware make their money on Linux by
> selling support not the software.  Its a
> really different thing since they can charge for that year after
> year.    Its really a totally different class and model
> than having digital objects for virtual worlds where you make you
> money in selling many of an item or selling
> one item for a very high rate.
>
> Open Source software logic has little bearing on VW Objects
> really.  Some how the person creating the objects
> has to get enough money to eat and support themselves.  That's
> what it boils down to.   Free isn't Free to
> someone,  normally that someone is the creator in the time they
> spent creating the object or world.
>
> The way that much of Linux has been developed is the authors are
> being paid by Redhat, Canonical, Novell,
> and others to work on a piece of the pie and then all are sharing
> the pie.   Its a very trusting relationship to have
> competitors working on the same platform together but its working
> so far.   Its not a typical arrangement.
> Still you have someone paying the authors so they can eat, its
> still not Free.
>
> If you read the GNU license it never was or has been written to
> state that the product is Free as in no money.
> GNU states the licensed code is free to be looked at and modified
> for other needs or fixed by others.   Richard
> Stalman often states this when he talks.   He believes that
> authors should be paid for their work.
>
>
> On 12 Oct 2010 at 15:23, Aldon Hynes wrote:
>
> > It may well be, however, that the leaving the existing group of
> > content creators who base their activity on trying to create copy
> > protected objects and instead encouraging and promoting a new
> > generation of content creators committed towards open source or
> > creative commons licensing may do much more to further virtual worlds.
> >
> > Now some people, used to proprietary systems may wonder how that could
> > ever be profitable, however, the folks at Redhat, Canonical and
> > related companies might have a different view about profitablity of
> > sharing created objects.
> >
> > Aldon
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: educators-bounces at lists.secondlife.com
> > > [mailto:educators-bounces at lists.secondlife.com]On Behalf Of Larry
> > > Havenstein Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 3:27 PM To: Kay McLennan;
> > > SL Educators TThe SLED List" Subject: Re: [SLED] Random Thoughts on
> > > the Evolution of Virtual Worlds
> > >
> > >
> > > Without a solid method of control (a group of people not machine
> > > control) of the IP rights most developers are leary to move content
> > > to OpenSim grids, especially ones that are making much money.
> > >
> > > This is mainly because it is so easy with the current systems to do
> > > "Copybotting" with a hacked viewer.
> > >
> > > At least in SL they have a people mechanism for DMCA complaints.
> > >  I don't think one exists in OSgrid.  I know
> > > one exists in Inworldz and because of it many profitable SL
> > > developers are setting up shop there.   Someone
> > > else would have to report if ReactionGrid has a published DMCA
> > > channel for complaints.
> > >
> > > But that is the reason you are getting many "Maybe" responses.
> > >
> > > On 12 Oct 2010 at 12:01, Kay McLennan wrote:
> > >
> > > >
> > > > I hope VW content creators decide to expand their businesses into
> > > > the different open sims. That is, with pay pal or even a SL-based
> > > > store (for payment in L$), it seems like it would not be hard to
> > > > facilitate deliveries to different VWs. Yet, out of the three SL
> > > > builders I have contacted about the possibility of purchasing
> > > > items for delivery in an open sim, only one said "maybe."
> > > >
> > > > More importantly, wouldn't it be possible to use some sort of
> > > > digital watermark to authenticate items? That is, it seems like
> > > > walling off a VW to prevent content from leaking out is a less
> > > > desirable or even less reliablethan simply developing a
> > > > [fool-proof] way toauthenticate digital content?
> > > >
> > > > --Kay McLennan
> > > >
> > > > On Tue, Oct 12, 2010 at 10:17 AM, Owen Kelly
> > > > <owen.kelly at arcada.fi> wrote:
> > > >     Three points in response:
> > > >
> > > >     1. I didn't mean to suggest that it was the Lindens fault, so
> > > >     much as they had one possible vision of a virtual economy
> > > >     which resulted in the creation of an arena for making real
> > > >     money, which resulted in creators who had invested their lives
> > > >     in becoming virtual artisans not wanting to lose their
> > > >     real-world homes.
> > > >
> > > >     2. I completely agree with the main point Eloise makes. This
> > > >     is a result of a strong application of copyright law where,
> > > >     for reasons outlined in the previous point, many people have
> > > >     an incentive to apply it strongly.
> > > >
> > > >     3. A positive way round it might be to lobby legislators,
> > > >     except my relevant legislators would be in Helsinki, which
> > > >     complicates matters.
> > > >
> > > >     4. Another way forward (which we are going to pursue in our
> > > >     new incarnation) is to make and distribute textures and
> > > >     objects with clear and explicit Creative Commons licences.
> > > >     That doesn't necessarily mean that we are "giving them away",
> > > >     but it does mean that we will be explaining exactly what
> > > >     rights people have over them. This goes somewhere (in my
> > > >     optimistic opinion) towards building a pedagogical point of
> > > >     view into an open economy.
> > > >
> > > >     Oops, that was four point :)
> > > >
> > > >     Cheers
> > > >     Owen
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >  <Larry>++
> > >
> > >  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >  Larry Havenstein
> > >   System Engineer and KSRE/COA Computer Security Officer
> > >   Information and Educational Technology
> > >   Department of Communications
> > >   K-State Research and Extension
> > >   Kansas State University
> > >    (785) 532-6270
> > >
> > >   Lhavenst at ksu.edu
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
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>
>  <Larry>++
>
>  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>  Larry Havenstein
>   System Engineer and KSRE/COA Computer Security Officer
>   Information and Educational Technology
>   Department of Communications
>   K-State Research and Extension
>   Kansas State University
>    (785) 532-6270
>
>   Lhavenst at ksu.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>



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