[SLED] Text Chat *and* Voice

Robbins, Sarah Brooke sbrobbins at bsu.edu
Tue Sep 26 10:03:37 PDT 2006


Thanks for the compliment. I feel the same way about the Harvard course. My students have expressed rather *cough* strong negative reactions to the way that course is being handled. I see it all as a wonderful learning experience for all of us. We won't know what works until we try it, reflect on it, and share it. I just read a great article by Steve Kraus about the first reactions to chalkboards in classrooms. The parallels are fantastic and enlightening.
Dr. Lamoureux's reflections about lectures in SL makes me think of another point that perhaps some would like to hash out. Do we need a "how to: public speaking in SL" tutorial? If one existed I would certainly read/watch it. It's a new skill that I know I need to develop. 

Sarah "Intellagirl" Robbins
PhD Student in Rhetoric and Composition
Ball State University, Muncie IN
www.secondlife.intellagirl.com
www.sarahrobbins.com
Yahoo: Intellagirl
SecondLife: Intellagirl Tully



-----Original Message-----
From: educators-bounces at lists.secondlife.com on behalf of Ed Lamoureux
Sent: Tue 9/26/2006 10:32 AM
To: SL Educators
Subject: Re: [SLED] Text Chat *and* Voice
 
Ah.
I love out Intellagirl.
She's at the top of her game.
But I have to disagree with some of her thoughts about lectures (even  
though she was nice enough to agree with me about some of my ideas  
about it)

While I'm real cautious about efforts to recreate lectures and  
recreations of lecture halls in SL (in other words, I'm going to be  
real careful about how I go about doing it), as Sarah notes, her  
classes are a mix of SL and RL.

I'm testing the SL platform as SL only.
With a high content need to deliver loads of information about which  
I need to talk.
Sure, I can have the students read some stuff, both from sources and  
from me.
But I just have to talk about some of the stuff. Some of what  
"happens" when teaching this stuff happens when I'm teaching this  
stuff. The lecture platform pushes a certain kind of performative  
outcome that doesn't happen in writing. Some of what "happens"  
happens for and to me; other stuff that happens happens to the  
students who are with me when I work.

So part of many of our three hours per night will be dedicated to  
lecture and questions and answers . . . and I HOPE that it's as  
interactive as are my f2f "lectures," even though it's in SL. I'll  
probably not use the lecture halls on NMC much . ..  we'll probably  
be in an open space somewhere (or maybe in the boardroom to avoid  
lots of walk in interruption).

I think that as a distance education platform, we need to be able to  
use ALL formats.. at this early juncture, I'm not ruling any out.

I must say, though, I'm not real hot on the Harvard argument class  
that pumps a pre-canned lecture into SL for watching and some  
(facilitated) discussion among the people/avis that are in the SL  
section. I wish them well. But I hope that co-presence and  
interactivity prevail inworld, rather than a preponderance of a  
different form of "watching more tv."


On Sep 26, 2006, at 8:06 AM, Robbins, Sarah Brooke wrote:

> This is a fascinating discussion! I'm an avid advocate of active  
> learning but I totally agree with Dr. Lamoureux. I take advantage  
> of the hybrid nature of my class to divide learning tasks into  
> theory (taught in lecture in my f2f sessions) and practice (taught  
> through activities in SL). As much as I would love to move to an  
> all practice-based format there are some topics in my discipline  
> that I simply can't teach through an exercise in SL and I won't  
> "lecture" in SL. It would be a total waste of the tool.
> In fact, I'll take it even one step further (it's early so what the  
> heck) and say that in a "best teaching practices" guide to teaching  
> university material in SL that I would write I would downright  
> prohibit using SL to recreate lecture/classroom settings to be used  
> for anything more than a starting or ending point for a class  
> activity. If my class wasn't a hybrid of f2f and SL time I would be  
> delivering my "lecture" materials via documents and interactive  
> discussion forums. When I see adverts for classes in SL that will  
> be recreations of lecture halls I cringe at the total  
> misunderstanding of SL as a teaching platform.
> Just my two cents.
>
> Sarah "Intellagirl" Robbins
> PhD Student in Rhetoric and Composition
> Ball State University, Muncie IN
> www.secondlife.intellagirl.com
> www.sarahrobbins.com
> Yahoo: Intellagirl
> SecondLife: Intellagirl Tully
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: educators-bounces at lists.secondlife.com on behalf of Ed Lamoureux
> Sent: Tue 9/26/2006 6:29 AM
> To: SL Educators
> Subject: Re: [SLED] Text Chat *and* Voice
>
>
> On Sep 26, 2006, at 5:59 AM, Eloise Pasteur wrote:
>
>>
>> What's the point of teaching? Putting your knowledge into their
>> heads, or getting them to learn and think?
>>
>> Eloise.
>
> Sometimes one of these goals is more important than the other. They
> are both relevant.
> I'm not teaching "how to do things in SL" .  . building, etc.
> I'm teaching "traditional" university-level material - - - some of
> which I have to take out of my head and offer for theirs. I face the
> same dilemma in my courses f2f. The students would sometimes like to
> be able to do something other than listen, take notes, and study.
> Much of the material I teach is NOT appropriate to active learning
> procedures. Other parts are. I have to try to work that out in what I
> ask of them. But I think it's downright silly to claim that lecturing
> is passe and that everything about learning and learners has changed.
> In some ways, we've cheapened our learning institutions by thinking
> and acting that way. Sometimes the professor actually does know what
> the students need to know and sometimes standing there and telling
> them about it, in an interesting and relevant way, IS the best
> learning approach. I can't do that by typing (at least, not if it's
> live and interactive with Q&A).
>
> Other things they will learn in SL on their own.. .they will do
> research about how people build communities of practice in SL.
>
> But there is NO WAY I could teach a college class via typing. I've
> had carpal tunnel surgery on my right wrist; I'm going back for an
> funny bone nerve release surgery on my elbow next week. This
> keyboarding is KILLING ME. I have empathy for folks with various
> physical limitations cause doing all this computer work is bringing
> disability close to my door. I cannot type well or fast enough to
> sustain any kind of momentum in a synchronous college-level class.
>
> We'll use teamspeex cause NMC has facilitated it on their campus and
> because I think it's about as good as I can do at this point.... if
> something better comes inworld and NMC can facilitate it, I'll use
> it. (I'm not able to use any of my campus's technical resources for
> my class . . . other than our network... NMC is facilitating this
> effort 100%, thank gawd).
>
> If the way I want to use Teamspeex fails over the course of my class,
> I'm going to be in real trouble.
>
> Edward Lee Lamoureux, Ph. D.
> Associate Professor, Multimedia Program
> and Department of Communication
> Co-Director, New Media Center
> 1501 W. Bradley
> Bradley University
> Peoria IL  61625
> 309-677-2378
> <http://slane.bradley.edu/com/faculty/lamoureux/website2/index.html>
> <http://gcc.bradley.edu/mm/>
> AIM/IM & skype: dredleelam
> Second Life: Professor Beliveau
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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Edward Lee Lamoureux, Ph. D.
Associate Professor, Multimedia Program
and Department of Communication
Co-Director, New Media Center
1501 W. Bradley
Bradley University
Peoria IL  61625
309-677-2378
<http://slane.bradley.edu/com/faculty/lamoureux/website2/index.html>
<http://gcc.bradley.edu/mm/>
AIM/IM & skype: dredleelam
Second Life: Professor Beliveau






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